Tag Archives: summer

Sparkling Window Washing Suds

27 Jun

If you’re having difficulty viewing the post, click on the title.

This soapy concoction will make your windows sparkle like never before.

Materials

  • Bucket
  • Dish soap
  • Rubbing alcohol
  • Sponge
  • Squeegee
  • Rags

In the bucket, place 5 drops of dish soap and one capful of rubbing alcohol. Add one gallon of warm water.

Dip the sponge in the solution and rub all over the windows.

Squeegee off soap and dry with a rag.

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What’s your Fruit Scale This Summer?

13 Jun

Is your patience already running out with your kids home for the summer? Our friend, Christine Cook, from truebluematch.com, shared this great idea on how to tell your kids that your patience is running out.

The Fruit Scale–Where are YOU at?

One of my all-time favorite parenting books is How To Talk So Kids Will Listen and Listen So Kids Will Talk.  It is full of great tips and helpful strategies to create and improve communication between parent and child.
One tip I took and morphed into my own years ago was creating a mood/energy scale.  This is a great tool to help your child visualize your mood/energy level.  The scale we used in our house for years was known as The Fruit Scale.  A typical conversation went something like this:
“OK boys, it has been a long day and my energy level is about at an orange.  We have showers, teeth and bedtime still to go.  Let’s see what we can do so that my energy level stays the same or gets bigger by the time we read stories tonight.”
Now THEY could see how their actions (or lack of) impacted my energy level.  If things were going well I would say, “Guys, this is great.  You got into your PJs right when I asked you to.  That just made my energy level go up to a grapefruit!”  Or, if they were not being helpful I’d say, “This is the third time I have asked you to start brushing your teeth.  That’s too bad because now my energy level is more of a kiwi!”
When it was time to read stories I used the energy I had to read.  If it was a large cantaloupe we’d read a few books.  My reading would be enthusiastic and upbeat, sometimes with accents and actions!  On the flip side,  if my energy level was more of a clementine I would read less and it would be much more subdued.  Raisin energy had me reading very little in a very dull, unenthusiastic tone.
The Fruit Scale (*read below about different scales) proved to be a very, very helpful tool.  It helped make the unknown (Mom’s energy level) very concrete.  Knowing that they could raise my energy from a grape to a watermelon by being helpful, kind and by following directions gave them some power.  It also turned it into a game which they loved.
Give it a try and let me know how it goes by clicking on “Contact Us” at truebluematch.com
Wishing you many WATERMELON days,
Christine Cook
Founder truebluematch.com

 

*Make it your own!

Try making your mood/energy scale fit your child’s interests.  Animal lovers might enjoy an animal scale where your mood/energy could go from a mouse to an elephant!  One child who loved memorizing the states responded well when his mom said, “My energy is Rhode Island!  What can we do to make it Texas again?”

Summer Reading Programs

4 Jun

Don’t miss these summer reading programs available to your kids. Kids of all ages can participate and often earn a prize for reading. It’s a great incentive. Here are some summer reading programs to try: Your library, Barnes and Noble or other bookstores, Scholastic Books,Sylvan Learning CentersHalf Price BookstoresPBSTD Bank, and Chuck E. Cheese.

Summer Fun

1 Jun

If you’re having difficulty reading this post, click on the blog title.

Summer’s here and our family is ready for some rest and relaxation. How about you?

Click on the calendar above to download a month of fun activities for your whole family. We’ll be posting fewer blogs this summer so we can spend more time with our kids. We’re using this calendar in our house to provide a little routine and some ideas so the summer doesn’t slip by.

We really want to see what you do this summer and we hope you’ll post some pictures on our Facebook page. We have so many followers from around the world that and there’s so much to share to bring us closer together. We also LOVE to look at pictures!

Here’s hoping you and your family have a great time together and enjoy the summer, or winter, if you’re south of the equator

 

Ask the Teacher

25 May

Whether your child is a high achieving student or needs some extra help, summer is a great time to practice all kinds of school related skills. Your child’s teacher knows your child’s skills better than anyone else and are your best resource.

Ask your child’s teacher for a suggestion on each of the following:

  • What is the most important skill my child could work on academically?
  • What social/emotional skill could my child work on improving?
  • If there was one thing your would recommend that my child could do over the summer what would it be?

Some of parents who read this will think that their child doesn’t need to work on any of the skills listed above. Believe it or not, every child has something to work on! Your child’s teacher spends at least 8 hours a day with your child in a setting far different than your home. They know many things you don’t know about your child!

Finally, and most importantly, when you ask the teacher these questions, listen carefully and be open-minded to what they are saying. Their advice will only make your child a better person and student.

Prepping for Summer

24 May

Now that you’ve got your summer routine in set up, it’s time to start prepping so you’re not scrambling for activities when the kids are out of school. We have lots of ideas of things to have available for the kids and activities, but you should only choose the ones you feel comfortable doing. You might want to select two or three of the listed activities to prep for your kids’ summer.

Identify the major chores you want to teach your kids this summer and add them to your calendar. Find places you can volunteer with your kids. Discover what activities your library will have this summer. Research places you want to go on a field trip and find out their hours and directions.

Reading Programs: Gather the record sheets for the summer reading programs available to you. Kids of all ages can participate and often earn a prize for reading. It’s a great incentive. Here are some summer reading programs to try: Your library, Barnes and Noble or other bookstores, Scholastic Books, Sylvan Learning Centers, Half Price Bookstores, PBS, TD Bank, and Chuck E. Cheese.

Art Activities: This is one of the best lists of art materials and activities I’ve ever seen. The best thing is that everything on the list can be purchased at the dollar store. I’m going to choose 3-5 of the activities to have on hand because they are different than any we’ve done before. I’m definitely getting yellow highlighters for glow in the dark activities and plastic table cloths for easy to set up slip and slides. My girls will even use a lot of the ideas for babysitting.

Science Activities: Don’t be afraid, science can be as easy as having your kids mix vinegar and baking soda with eye droppers. Here are some other simple ideas: Make a leaf rubbing, bird feeder, plant some flowers, go geocaching, or melt an iceberg.

Writing Activities: Fill a basket with writing materials, make some shape books, covered books, accordion books.

Math Activities: Make a card holder and get a deck of cards, pick up some foam shapes for the bath tub, bake or cook something.

If you prep one thing from each activity now, you’ll have a trick to pull out of your sleeve at a moments notice. We even have great suggestions on our Pinterest board for you to check out. If you don’t have a Pinterest account, just ask us for an invite.

Also, we LOVE to see what you and your kids are up to this summer. Share some pictures with us on our Facebook page.

Daily Planning

23 May

Now that the big activities and events are on your summer calendar, it’s time to look individual days.

If you have younger children, you probably have a regular routine that you can continue during the summer. However, if you have a mix of younger kids and school age kids, it might not be so easy. Your school age kids aren’t used to being home with you every day and will want a plan that revolves around what they want to do.

Here are some suggestions to make everyone have a happy summer, and remember, this is a routine so it needs to remain flexible.

Before 9:00 Parents can do their things and the kids can have breakfast, sleep in, watch some cartoons, etc.

9:00 Everyone is out of their pjs, breakfast eaten and ready to start the day.

9-10:00ish Get in some time outdoors, play a game, do a simple art project, science experiment, run some errands, etc.

10:00-11:30ish Major day activity: Library, Volunteering, etc. Depending upon the age of your kids, you can incorporate the 9-10 time with this time.

11:30-12:30ish Make, eat and clean up lunch. The kids should help with all aspects of this

12:30-1:30ish Quiet time for everyone, even mom! Everyone retreats to their room for some time away from each other. This may mean naps, resting, reading or other quiet activity. We don’t recommend video or hand held games during this time because kids need to learn how to relax their body and mind.

1:30-4:30ish This is our get outside, learn how to play independently, go to the pool, have a friend over, tire the kids out time. Summer may seem like kids should stay up until all hours, but you will have less meltdowns and drama if the kids go to bed at a reasonable time. So use this time to get the kids worn out.

4:30-6:30ish Clean up, dinner prep, quiet play and dinner. This is a great time to have the kids help clean up after the outdoor activities. They can also help you prepare for dinner. At 5 years old, we think kids are ready to plan and cook a full meal with you at least once during the summer. Having them help you prepare daily meals will prepare them for making a meal on their own. It also gives you great time to talk to your kids. Younger kids can “cook” by playing with old spices and mixing bowls. Older kids may want to make pictures using left over cereal, dried beans, etc. while you cook. (Check out this idea our faculty member, Gretchen Stout, did with her kids at dinner time prep.)

6:30-7:30ish Special time with a parent. This is a great time to spend with mom or dad if they work outside the house. Or, you can spend individual time with just one child.

7:30-8:30ish Bath, bed and story time. Just because the kids went in the pool for the day doesn’t mean a bath isn’t important. The point of the bath is to set a bedtime routine and relax them for sleeping. You can make the bath fun by putting some glow sticks in the water and turning out the lights or fill the bath with lots of balloons. We’ve pinned a few fun bathtub ideas on our Pinterest board. Because it’s summer, you also don’t have to rush bath time, so let them play. After the bath, have the same routine about brushing teeth, putting on pjs and reading a story. Again, you don’t have to rush.

9:00ish Lights out and the grownups can spend some time together.

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