Tag Archives: family

Great Read Aloud Books

30 Jul

THIS IS IMPORTANT!

Now that I have your attention, I wanted you to know that you should read to your kids until they are at least 11 or 12 years old. (Some kids will let you read to them until they leave the house.) Select books that are at a higher level than they can read by themselves, but can still understand. Reading aloud to your kids will encourage their imagination, build vocabulary and model reading skills. Most of all it will be a great bonding time for your family.

It’s important not to change the vocabulary words or ask your child to help you read. You are the reader and they are the listener.

Here’s a list of books we think your kids would enjoy listening to.

Ages 5 and up

  • Charlotte’s Web by E. B. White
  • Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
  • Little House series by Laura Ingalls Wilder
  • The Boxcar Children by Gertrude Chandler Warner
  • Sarah, Plain and Tall by Patricia MacLachlan
  • Stone Fox by John Reynolds Gardiner
  • Matilda by Roald Dahl
  • Ramona Quimby, Age 8 by Beverly Cleary
  • Sideways Stories from Wayside School by Lois Sachar
  • Harriet the Spy by Louise Fitzhugh
  • A Light in the Attic by Shel Silverstein
  • Mr. Popper’s Penguins by Richard Atwater
  • Stuart Little by E. B. White
Ages 7 and up
  • The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis
  • Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L ‘Engle
  • The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
  • Indian in the Cupboard by Lynne Reid Banks
  • Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell
  • Maniac Magee by Jerry Spinelli
  • The BFG by Roald Dahl
  • James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl
  • Number the Stars by Lois Lowry
  • Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of Nimh by Robert C. O’Brien
  • The Best Christmas Pageant Ever by Barbara Robinson
  • Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing by Judy Blume
  • My Father’s Dragon by Ruth Stiles Gannett
  • Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech
  • The Trumpet of the Swan by E.B. White
  • The Cay by Theodore Taylor
  • The Chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis
  • The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster
  • Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery
  • The Great Gilly Hopkins by Katherine Paterson
  • The Watsons Go to Birmingham-1963 by Christopher Paul Curtis
Ages 9 and up
  • Hatchet by Gary Paulsen
  • Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
  • Shiloh by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
  • The Giver by Lois Lowry
  • Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry by Mildred D. Taylor
  • Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt
  • The Witch of Blackbird Pond by Elizabeth George Speare
  • Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls
  • The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
  • Summer of the Monkeys by Wilson Rawls
  • The Sign of the Beaver by Elizabeth George Speare

Your Family Matters

10 Jul
Image

Running your kids………..

I usually don’t compare people to dogs, but then again, we are all animals by nature. As a dog lover of 6 ( 4 are rescue dogs ), I have 2 labs and a Golden and energy are their middle names, especially the Labs. I know quite well that if they don’t get that 15 to 20 minutes of exercise a day ( we play fetch and an interesting version of dog/person baseball ), they will likely get into trouble or dive me crazy . On the other hand. If they are given the attention to get things off their “paws”, they are loving, relatively calm ( Labs?) , and rest peacefully at night. If this sounds familiar to kids, you are dead on.

The plethora of studies emphasizing the beneficial effects of regular exercise for children far exceed the amount of space for this week’s column. I will instead suffice it to say, exercise is better than any magic pill for both the physical and emotional sides of life. What’s nice is that the effects are immediate and long lasting if they are fun and enjoyable.

But for most kids, exercise is boring unless they are really into sports. This lasts into the teenage years when some then decide to pay attention to their bodies and decide to get into shape or are forced to by that high school coach The motivation here for most of the teens is to attract the opposite sex and become stronger than the concept of exercise as a form of self-therapy and self-care. That comes into play for many adults. The rest of the teens and adults alike tend to be sedentary and often overweight and depressed.

Now, getting kids to exercise when they don’t want to is a common parental battle often compared to bring a horse to water. On this one, I think we pick this battle for it has to do with both the physical and mental health of our kids. As a loving parent, we owe them a long and healthy life. So, how do we win this one? It’s actually pretty easy especially if you have dogs.

1. Exercise yourself as an example to your kids. Modeling behavior as a parent carries a lot of weight. Most kids identify with their parents – both the good and not good stuff – Exercise and fitness is obviously a good one.

2. Exercise with your kids on a daily basis. I personally love this one. My kids and I do a variety of challenges daily. Running time trials ; swimming; tennis; or we make up games like “tickle monster”. We engage in one of these for 20 minutes a day and we all feel and act better towards one another.

3. Reward the behavior. Make the outcome a celebration – make a healthy smoothie together. Kids love to win by the way and parents need to be okay with losing.

4. Take turns making up sport or activity games. The rules might get a little confusing and change frequently, but the idea is that everyone plays and gets the benefits of exercise. Consider NOT keeping score to reduce competition unless they are all against you make a big deal if they beat you.

I officially recommend adding running to your parent list of “things to do with my kids everyday”, and watch the benefits before your eyes. Stay healthy.

Dr. Keith Kanner

Anchor/Host Your Family Matters

Mental Health Expert/Contributor

NBC California Nonstop

http://www.kanner.tv

Glowing Bubble Bath

30 May

Fill a tub with bubbles, then add some glow sticks. Turn out the lights for a unique bath time!

Bubble Wands

29 May

Click here for some other items to use as bubble wands. You probably already have them in your house.

Bubble Stuff

28 May

I love this idea for a bubble refill station. There are so many cute jugs and dispensers out there now. For the bubble recipe, click on the picture.

*Once recipe calls for glycerin and the other for corn syrup. Both are added to give the bubble a stronger outside so it will last longer. We recommend the glycerin recipe, however be prepared because a small bottle costs about $5. The corn syrup recipe works but leaves a sticky film on hands. It’s much cheaper though.

Mapping Out the Big Stuff

22 May

When I think about my childhood summer, I think about days on end spent outside swimming and playing. When I think about my own children’s summer, I think about scheduling. It’s unfortunate, I clearly know, but I function better with a routine and so do my kids. The most important thing I remember about creating our summer routine is that it is never set in stone and can always be changed.

My last blog gave you a video overview of how I plan my summers with my kids, and today I’ll break it down in to how I map out the “big” stuff. Since the school year is busy and exhausting that we often don’t take advantage of our great city or spend as much time doing the things that are truly important to our family. Our summer calendar allows us spend more quality time together and enjoying the things we love. Now that my children are older, we also have some major activities, events, and camps that they attend. Here’s how I make it all work.

First: The first thing I write on my calendar are: camps, vacations, mission trips, and any other events that have unchangeable dates.

Next: After those are in place, I give each weekday a specific activity. In our house, Monday is library day, Tuesday is volunteer day, Wednesday is major chore day, Thursday is school work day, and Friday is field trip day. Your family may want to make one day play date day or pool day. It just depends upon what works for your family and how old your children are.

Now that you see how I map out the major events, let me give you a few suggestions for the each day.

Library Day: You may not know all of the services your library offers; I know we didn’t. Here’s a list of some things your library may offer during the summer. Storytimes, art activities, guest musicians, performances, summer reading programs. We even found out that our library has a program for kids 12 and up that gives them the opportunity to review books before they are even published. My avid reader can’t wait to be part of that this summer. Teach your kids about all of the resources the library can offer them. Trust me, when they’re in high school they’ll appreciate it! Don’t forget to check out some books, too!

Volunteer Day: Did you know that even infants can volunteer? When my kids were ages 0 and 3, we would make a weekly visit to the assisted living home. The residents loved it! I will never forget the older woman who sat in her wheelchair and rolled a ball with my son who was a crawler at the time. At the end of our visit, she would always ask if we would be back. My 3-year-old would color or do a simple puzzle with the residents. They always loved getting her pictures when she was finished.

Some volunteer places have age restrictions but Meals on Wheels and nursing homes are always appreciative of children’s art work. (I’m sure you have a lot of drawings around your house you don’t know what to do with. ;)) Older children can help prepare meals, stuff envelopes for an organization, dust the shelves or clean pews at a church. There are so many organizations needing help, I’m sure you will easily find something that works for your family. (You can always contact Smart Mom U for volunteer ideas. We’d be happy to help you.)

Major Chore Day: Daily chores are great but why not get some help with major chores around the house. Aren’t kids closer to the baseboards than you? This is a great life lesson to teach kids about keeping their living area clean and healthy. Here’s a list of some chores your kids can do to help around the house.

School day: Even though school is out, it’s still important to keep those little minds engaged. Research shows that kids who don’t do any work over the summer lose 2 months worth of learning and they spend the beginning of the new school year catching up. If your kids are little, spend only 15-30 minutes working on some simple skills. Older elementary and middle schoolers should spend about an hour on some kind of school work. This summer, we’re going to work on our writing skills. Although my kids have learned good writing skills at school, we’re going to focus on learning how to narrow down a story topic, writing more interesting sentences, improving word choice. It sounds daunting but all I am doing is taking what they have brought home from school and helping them edit one or two stories during the summer. You can get more ideas for school-like activities on our website in our Summer School or Junior College. (P.S. Workbooks are good but not necessary. We do recommend Summer Bridge workbooks and have them for sale through Amazon in our website bookstore.)

Field Trip Day: This is one of my favorite days because our city has so much to offer kids of all ages. We have been on some field trips that weren’t so fun, but most of them have been fantastic. There are even some my kids request every summer. Some of the field trips we take are for learning purposes so I try to choose some that went along with what they studied during the year. For instance, they all learned about Kansas History so we will take a field trip to one of the sites that has costumed interpreters who will demonstrate what Kansas was like during the pioneer days. Other field trips are just to get out and have some fun. We may bring a picnic and some friends and try a park we’ve never been to. Younger kids may enjoy being engaged during a field trip and we have lots of ideas on how to do this, so let us know how we can help.

You’ll be amazed at how much fun you can have this summer with a little bit of planning. Don’t forget to contact us if you need some ideas.

Making Chores Fun

18 May

  • Work together.
  • Fill a squirt gun with water and a drop of dish soap. Have them shoot at the baseboards.
  • Clean or pick up items by color.
  • Play basketball with the laundry. Set up three baskets; lights, whites, and darks. Have the children shoot the clothes into the correct basket. This works for toys too.
  • Give them the tools. Little kids like kid-sized tools and can use them easier. Older kids can use adult size cleaning tools. What kid doesn’t love a Swiffer?
  • Blast the dance music.
  • Create a special name for your cleaning crew.
  • Allow your child to be the “inspector”. They can look at your work and give you a pointer or two.
  • Put socks on little hands for dusting and wiping windows. You can even decorate them to be “dust monsters”.
  • 10 minute clean ups are great for the end of the day. Set a timer for 10 minutes and see how much you can get done before it rings.
  • Take a “coffee” break after completing some chores.
  • Use pretend play. If you want your child to help with dishes, play restaurant. If you want your child to deliver things to different rooms, play post office.

Don’t forget to have a special treat for a job well done!

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